Tag Archives: doctor

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new book cover


Think I might call this series “Paediatrician on a Mission’

You heard it here first!

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Stop your child gagging when the doc looks in their throat


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Check out my no-nonse ebook - Kid's Constipation - Crack It!

Check out my no-nonse ebook – Kid’s Constipation – Crack It!

I really need to do a video or photo series for this one!

I actually need to do a video of how to position children to look in their ears and throat – it is positioning that makes it least traumatic – the doctor should only concentrate on looking & to look quickly.

Not sure how I came to even know about this – trial & error or inside info – I’m not sure.
All parents remember traumatic times having their child’s throat examined – and a very unlikely few will ave experienced a simultaneous vomit.

There s a much easier way. Generally the trauma and vomits are caused by much the same
effect as ases the mouth to open to see the throat – the gag reflex stimulated by pushing something back in the mouth towards the back to trigger the gag reflex.

OK, how to avoid it?

Strangely it’s actually fairly simple – though only really works in children old enough to co-operate, or young enough to be ‘positioned’.

I tell children that if they can do things this way, i won’t need the wooden spatula – and then i put it visible, but very obviously out f my reach.
By leaning the upper body forwards, and then tipping the head backwards, the tonsils become easily visible without any additional manoeuvres – everyone is happy!
Try it next time you’re getting your child’s throat examined. I’d love someday to ave this as the standard examination method for kids throats.

Let me know what happens when you try it!

56 people read this on day one – please feel free to leave comments!

Stop that horrible ‘gag’ when your child’s throat is examined with this easy tip – need to reach lots of docs!


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I really need to do a video or photo series for this one!

I actually need to do a video of how to position children to look in their ears and throat – it is positioning that makes it least traumatic – the doctor should only concentrate on looking & to look quickly.

Not sure how I came to even know about this – trial & error or inside info – I’m not sure.
All parents remember traumatic times having their child’s throat examined – and a very unlikely few will ave experienced a simultaneous vomit.

There s a much easier way. Generally the trauma and vomits are caused by much the same
effect as ases the mouth to open to see the throat – the gag reflex stimulated by pushing something back in the mouth towards the back to trigger the gag reflex.

OK, how to avoid it?

Strangely it’s actually fairly simple – though only really works in children old enough to co-operate, or young enough to be ‘positioned’.

I tell children that if they can do things this way, i won’t need the wooden spatula – and then i put it visible, but very obviously out f my reach.
By leaning the upper body forwards, and then tipping the head backwards, the tonsils become easily visible without any additional manoeuvres – everyone is happy!
Try it next time you’re getting your child’s throat examined. I’d love someday to ave this as the standard examination method for kids throats.

Let me know what happens when you try it!

56 people read this on day one – please feel free to leave comments!

My ideal patient asks questions!


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Surely the best patient is one with a simple story, a simple diagnosis and easy treatment?

Certainly one who is out the door quickly & ‘job’s a good ‘un’ but, God, really? Nice to have an occasional patient like this, but really??

Think of a teacher who marks 50 papers on students they never meet – they are all nearly perfect but there’s no real flavour of the students in them. Dull, boring & needing masses of caffeine to keep going.
Now imagine one is less perfect, less constrained – and honestly, a whole lot more interesting. Teachers love that. And you know what, so do doctors! We love a challenge. If I can’t quickly & succinctly convince a slightly sceptical family that our plan is a good one…..I may a well pack up & go home now!

Please, challenge me, ask questions! I mean it! It’s often when challenged that I start to see the obvious flaws in what may have been established thinking. Medicine and more importantly day-to-day practice evolves. It’s not just Tefal-heads in labs that make that happen, it’s me & a family that checked out Google or a stroppy teen, or a ‘precocious’ kid in a room working it out and finding solutions that work on the ground that moves things forward.

Don’t get me wrong, I’ll be pleased to meet you if you’re happy and it’s all easy, but I’ll remember you more if we all really worked to get you better.

Hopefully someday we’ll get to try it out!

drsharryn@me.com

Drsharryn’s Daily Health Hints & Dits


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This is a great resource! Paper.li – I have Ben Cummings Chirobullets to thank for this.
I can digest and share really topical and local news and become a real part of the local community.

It tweets direct to my Twitter account daily, but does do automatically before I finish editing and has the chance to select the most important stories and promoting their authors. The relevance however is not in doubt ( though I tend to get a lot of Spanish posts!). It looks slick and dynamic and is customisable ( though only between editions unfortunately).

I feel like some hotshot publisher ( which of course I am – TFIC!

I keep 2 others for my personal daily research and it all actually takes surprisingly little time. They can be configured to include pretty much any twitter accounts, Facebook posts, RSS feeds etc. now just need to use it more widely.

BW
Drsharryn

Medical training versus solution focused therapy training


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They are both patient-centred (or should be!), they are both rigorous in terms of the effort required. Why then are the learning and practising environments so different?

First up, I love medicine. Not a little, but hugely! If I had my time again, I’d hope to make exactly the same leaps and little stumbles that brought me here to my niche in Paediatrics. I can’t imagine a more fun, satisfying or rewarding career (except one that has Solution Focus Therapy embedded in it’s fabric!).

Medicine attracts those with minds demonstrating an ability to absorb and regurgitate complex scientific material – they encompass all personalities with this. Solution-focused therapy also appears to encompass many & varied personalities, but they appear to share more personality traits.They can focus on positives in a sea of negatives, they can probe and probe sensitively to push doors gently open. They can put their egos aside and happily become invisible within the consultation.

Medical training is to an extent very didactic and very competitive (I mean that very sincerely in a positive way). Doctors learn to weigh possibilities and probabilities and arrive at a diagnosis. It’s always a risk – just the most likely based on the information available at that point. The public haven’t as a rule appreciated this however. Don’t get me wrong – taking any risks is wrong. It is merely the inherent risk in the actual cause being something very rare or an unusual presentation, or that the essential diagnostic information has not yet declared itself rather than any form of incompetent or negligent decision.

As a recent US doc commented ‘docs can do “grey”‘where nursing training is more protocol or “black&white”. One drawback to this is that doctors virtually always have AN answer and they have to pursue it with a degree of convincing confidence. As with any risks – sometimes they’re wrong.
As a group we also seem to have a guilt complex – we beat ourselves up even when we couldn’t POSSIBLY have altered the outcome. Admitting failure is seen a weakness. But surely occasional failure is inevitable? -it’s reducing the frequency and magnitude that are real skills.

I’ve always been open to criticism of my decisions. It’s healthy not just for humility but offers real protection against the risk of making an error. It’s also healthy for junior staff to be able to critically reflect on senior’s decisions. Nursing staff in particular are very good at expressing their reservations about diagnoses or treatment decisions. This makes for a supportive and dynamic environment. It also gives me much greater confidence knowing that my team are part of decision-making and will not hold back on making their views known – even if they are widely different to mine.I’m frankly not interested in a ‘yes’ team.

Sir Lancelot Spratt is long- dead here!

Perhaps this attitude meant I was ‘ripe’ for SFT training!

How was it different? How,if at all, was it similar?

Starting with a positive mood-setter was eye-opening (and certainly mind-opening!) for me. It was an integral part of the day, of the group dynamic. There was some didactic teaching, but inevitably followed by lively discussion and questions!

People made suggestions and criticisms were not really criticisms but merely observations. The material was often very personal giving participants a stake in it. The positive feedback was exactly that – it made people feel ‘up’. Participants wanted to keep in touch after the course and shared previous experiences and hopes for the future.

Conferences in medicine can be like that. Resuscitation courses are often the opposite. They feel competitive. They have scenarios (just like role-play here) but where positive feedback is given first it tends to be slightly perfunctory and just act a sweetener before the real business of getting down to criticising. There is an attitude of ‘all in it together’ or ‘there but for the grace of God’ evident though.

Submitting work is different too. I spent ages thinking through my certificate essay and rejigging it in my head. After I eventually wrote it (a thoroughly enjoyable process) I submitted it (as a first draft). I expected negative criticism and a few rewrites and resubmissions. Chris Iveson had already made it clear that it was the authenticity of the story and the material that really counted. I didn’t really believe him – & I was wrong. 100% wrong!

The feedback was very positive and the essay has been modified slightly and submitted in Solution News in March 2012. I was on cloud 9!

I’m hoping to enrol for the Diploma in September and am eager to do it – not like many medical courses where you want to have done it rather than actually enjoy the doing it.

BRIEF Solution Focused Therapy


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What is this all about?
Surely General Paediatrics is just what is says on the tin – you diagnose, you treat & the job’s a good ‘un.
Except often it’s not. That”s not because our diagnosis was wrong or slightly off, and not because we didn’t choose the best medicine.
It’s because as doctors we’re a bit reluctant to admit it’s not just medical – it seems like admitting failure. Saying there’s a psychological element sounds like a cop-out when nothing else has helped.

But what if we turned it all on its head? What if we recognised that there aren’t exclusively medical or exclusively psychological problems, but one big bulge right in the middle? What if we set out right from the start to include psychological aspects as part of the cause right from the get-go – because we knew we old treat them?

So far there’s no practitioners occupying that niche (I have it all to myself so far), though with medical advice involved it could never be ‘pure’ SFT.

Think about it – it’s perfect!

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